Double Weave Revisited

Of the many ways of designing and weaving double weave, my favorite is loom-controlled, patterned double weave.  On my 16-shaft treadle loom I can weave up to 4 blocks of plain weave as well as network drafted double weave designs.  I have written several posts on this topic and thought it was time for another visit because it really is so much fun!

In this post I share photos, drafts and notes about my recent projects that include a 16-shaft, 4-block double weave table runner and a couple of 8-shaft, 2-block placemats.  I also share a photo of a double weave Tencel shawl that I plan on submitting to my guild’s annual exhibit in April.

Double Weave Table Runner – 16 shafts

The first project is a table runner I wove using 5/2 pearl cotton with a sett of 28 e.p.i. that turned out to have a fairly good but not perfectly balanced weave.  I happen to like it this way, but a wider sett of 24-26 e.p.i. would have helped make the rectangular areas be more square.  After twisting the fringes, I washed it by hand, spin dried in the washer but I could have rolled it in a towel too, laid flat to dry and steam ironed while it was still a bit damp.  Here it is:

Double Weave Table Runner, Pearl Cotton, 2014

Double Weave Table Runner, Pearl Cotton, 2014

As part of the preparation for this project I wove a small plain weave sample to see how the colors mix with each other:

Prep for Double Weave Table Runner - yarns, warp, and sample

Prep for Double Weave Table Runner – yarns, warp, and sample

The design started out with a profile draft that is a variation of the same profile draft I designed for the Turned Twill Table Runner that I wrote about in my previous post.  It’s a 4-block profile draft to be woven on 16 shafts:

PROFILE DRAFT for Double Weave Table Runner (4 blocks to be woven on 16 shafts)

PROFILE DRAFT for Double Weave Table Runner (4 blocks to be woven on 16 shafts)

With the magic of block substitution, my weaving software (Fiberworks PCW) generated the complete drawdown.  You can do this manually as well (it’s still magical!) by looking at the profile draft and substituting the following for each block:  first block is threaded and treadled 1, 2, 3, 4; second block 5, 6, 7, 8; third block 9, 10 ,11, 12; and fourth block 13, 14, 15, 16.  I then experimented with different colors and came up with a color scheme I liked, choosing colors that I had in 5/2 pearl cotton in my stash.  Below are different views of the thread-by thread draft.  The double weave view shows how each side actually appears, one side appears different than the other side.  The close-up interlacement view shows how the warp and weft interlace or cross each other and gives you a hint that there are 2 layers with areas in one layer exchanging places with areas in the other layer:

Draft for double weave table runner (double weave view, side 1)

Draft for double weave table runner (double weave view, side 1)

Draft for double weave table runner (double weave view, side 2)

Draft for double weave table runner (double weave view, side 2)

Draft for double weave table runner (close-up of one section, interlacement view, side 1)

Draft for double weave table runner (close-up of one section, interlacement view, side 1)

Double Weave Placemats – 8 shafts

The second project is a couple of placemats I wove using 20/2 unmercerized cotton, 2 strands used together as one, with a sett of 40 e.p.i.  I wove a few inches of basket/plain weave with the 20/2 cotton used singly in between mats to be turned and hand sewn as hems for a neat finish after the wet finishing process which was the same as that for the table runner.  Here’s how the placemats turned out:

Double Weave Placemats, Cotton, 2014

Double Weave Placemats, Cotton, 2014

The design for the placemats also started out with a profile draft, but this time with only 2 blocks to be woven on 8 shafts:

PROFILE DRAFT for Double Weave Placemats (2 blocks to be woven on 8 shafts)

PROFILE DRAFT for Double Weave Placemats (2 blocks to be woven on 8 shafts)

As before, block substitution generated the complete drawdown, the first block is threaded and treadled 1, 2, 3, 4 and the second block 5, 6, 7, 8.  Since this pattern looks so busy I decided to use only 2 colors to make it appear simpler and to highlight the balance between the dark and light areas.  Below is the thread-by-thread draft in double weave view of one side.  I didn’t show the other side because it looks the same except that the dark and light areas are interchanged.  The close-up of one section of the draft in interlacement view also shows the basket/plain weave I mentioned earlier that I used to weave for the hems on the placemats.  As you can see in the tie-up you need two extra treadles to do this.

Draft for Double Weave Placemats (double weave view)

Draft for Double Weave Placemats (double weave view)

Draft for Double Weave Placemats (close-up of one section, interlacement view with basket weave for the hem)

Draft for Double Weave Placemats (close-up of one section, interlacement view with basket weave for the hem)

A Challenge

OK, I asked myself, what now?  How about challenging myself to weave something interesting in double weave to enter in my guild’s show in March?  After experimenting with many drafts, I came up with a 16-shaft networked draft for double weave that looks like mosaic when viewed from a distance and also looks interesting when viewed close-up.  I liked the design and wove this Tencel shawl:

Double Weave Mosaic Shawl, Tencel, 2014

Double Weave Mosaic Shawl, Tencel, 2014

UPDATE March 31, 2014:  This shawl received “The Kathryn Wellman Memorial Award” for imaginative weaving incorporating design, color and texture at the 2014 Philadelphia Guild of Handweavers “Celebration of Fibers” exhibit.

Now it’s time to start thinking about the next challenge…see you next time!

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15 Comments on “Double Weave Revisited”

  1. Susanne Says:

    That is just awesome

  2. Ellen Turner Says:

    That last project makes me long for 16 shafts, although I am normally more than happy with the 12 I have!

  3. ml Says:

    Beautiful, Eva, and very inspiring.


  4. Such fun! Thanks soooo much for sharing. I love the mosaic shawl as well as the table runner and mats. Linda

  5. Janis Cohen Says:

    WOW! Just love doubleweave. I love the colors you chose. AbFab! Thanks for sharing – janis [2crazy4books2]

  6. warpology Says:

    OMG I didn’t know the software did this Thank you so much for posting this! Love your projects too.

  7. Carol Oldfield Says:

    I have been wanting to do some doubleweave for a while now, but still getting my head around it. It seems the more I read, the more confusing it becomes, but your posts have been very helpful, so I intend taking the plunge as soon as my floor loom is free and put a warp on for sampling.

    • evasweaving Says:

      Carol, I know double weave sounds a bit confusing because it’s hard to imagine more than 1 layer of fabric being woven at the same time with parts of one layer sometimes changing places with the other one. When you actually try it on your loom it will become easier to understand how it works. I’m glad you find my posts helpful, thank you!

      Eva

  8. Hedy Lyles Says:

    Hi Eva — the shawl and table runner are both beautiful. I really look forward to seeing the shawl at the show.. I was inspired by your echo weave scarf last year and spent a couple months playing with echo weave this year. I was also intrigued when you told me the software could design for 16 shafts but 64 TREADLES. So I’ve been playing with that also. Very enjoyable blog!!
    Hedy Lyles

    • evasweaving Says:

      Hi Hedy, so nice to hear from you! I look forward to the show again this year and to see your latest beautiful work. It’s fantastic you’re working with echo weave, I plan on doing some more work with it myself. The software can actually design for 64 treadles AND 64 shafts so you can take advantage of this too by designing a pattern line on more than 16 shafts and then telescope it back to 16 and see how your threading changes with some very interesting results. Thanks so much for visiting my blog and for your comment!

      Eva

  9. Linda Says:

    Eva:

    Your work is so thoughtfully and beautifully executed. I thank you for the detailed information that you always provide. I always feel like your posts are chock full of information that are definitely ahead of my own understanding of drafts at this point. I am always inspired to read and re-read and try what it is that you’ve taught so well with your posts. I could spend many hours studying your posts and certainly will be doing that. Thank you for taking the time to share your wealth of knowledge and, even better, your zeal for trying new things and taking your explorations one step further. Your blog is truly a wealth of information and a gift of a resource for weavers at all levels.

    • evasweaving Says:

      Linda, wow…thank you so much. Weaving is just so awesome, you never run out of things to learn, and challenging yourself is very rewarding. My very best to you on this amazing journey.

      Eva

  10. betty smit Says:

    Dear Eva, this is a beatiful double on 8 shafts. Irresistable!
    Betty Smit, NL


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