Magenta Scarf & My First Networked Weaving Drafts

Sweeping curves, subtle curves, unusual shapes and intricate patterns are some design elements that can be produced with network drafting.  The first time I read about this topic was in the Summer 1989 issue of Weaver’s Magazine in an article by Alice Schlein, “Network Drafting: More For Less.”  Since then there’s been a wealth of information written about this subject in weaving books and magazines.

Bonnie Inouye’s online article on Weavezine (August 28, 2009), “Flowing Curves: Network Drafted Twill,” is excellent with a great bibliography that includes Twill Thrills (The Best of Weaver’s), Bonnie’s book, Exploring Multishaft Design and Alice Schlein’s book, Network Drafting: An Introduction.

I’m a beginner at creating networked drafts on the computer and it’s mesmerizing!  Keeping in mind some of the things I learned from books and articles, I used my weaving program (Fiberworks PCW) to help me come up with a pattern for the Magenta Scarf.  Here’s a sketchy list of what I did before I ended up with the final design:  1) started with a twill tie-up on 16 shafts, 2) used the “freehand draw” tool and did a few curve-like shapes in the threading area, 3) warp: “redraw as network,” 4) warp: “make symmetrical,” 5) weft: “weave as drawn in,” 6) “parallel repeat/extended” in warp and weft, 7) out of curiosity switched from “tie-up mode” to “lift plan mode” and back again, lo and behold the tie-up looked different now, 8 ) tie-up: “turn draft” and repeated step 6 and wow I really liked how the threading, treadling and tie-up looked, 9) checked for floats and longest was four, 10) deleted(!) most of the design and only kept the flower-like part with a border as the final pattern for the scarf.  This is how I learned about some of the different tools and commands in this program after studying the manual.

I finished weaving the scarf last week – here are some notes on finishing:  I used 10/2 pearl cotton at a sett of 32 e.p.i., washed it by hand, hung to dry, ironed while still damp.  In addition to the weaving drafts for the scarf I also included at the end of this post a few 8 shaft networked drafts I did that I think would be fun to weave and hope weavers might find useful.  As with other drafts on my blog, I would be happy to send any WIF files to anyone who requests them.

Magenta Scarf (designed using network drafting)

Magenta Scarf (designed using network drafting)

Magenta Scarf (detail 1)

Magenta Scarf (detail 1)

Magenta Scarf (detail 2)

Magenta Scarf (detail 2)

Networked Weaving Draft 1 (for Magenta Scarf)

Networked Weaving Draft 1 (for Magenta Scarf)

Networked Weaving Draft 1 detail (for Magenta Scarf)

Networked Weaving Draft 1 detail (for Magenta Scarf)

Networked Weaving Draft 2

Networked Weaving Draft 2

Networked Weaving Draft 3

Networked Weaving Draft 3

UPDATE:  Please note that I wrote this post many years ago.  Since that time I learned more about networked drafts and how to design them correctly and more easily.  To view my later posts about network drafting click on Categories – Networked Drafts.

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8 Comments on “Magenta Scarf & My First Networked Weaving Drafts”

  1. julie Says:

    Hello,
    I have really enjoyed looking at your patterns you designed on your computer! WOW! I just got a loom and
    have finished a few scarfs and shaws. I just love the
    networked weaving draft 2 pattern. could you do that
    one on a 4 draft loom? Your magenta scarf is beautiful! Great job!
    looking forward to hear from you.
    julie

    • evasweaving Says:

      Thank you, Julie, for your comment! I’m not sure if draft pattern 2 can be done on 4 shafts, but there are patterns that are somewhat similar to it that you can find in some weaving books. My first floor loom had 4 shafts and my favorite weaving pattern book was Marguerite Porter Davison’s “A Handweaver’s Pattern Book” where all the patterns were for a 4 shaft loom. There’s another more recent book that I’ve looked at that I think is also wonderful by Anne Dixon (Interweave Press), “The Handweaver’s Pattern Directory (Over 600 weaves for four-shaft looms).” I hope this is helpful to you and may you continue weaving happily!
      Eva

  2. buyathread Says:

    Wowee, Eva! Lovely job on a beautiful, complex weave. It was nice of you to include interesting variations too. I have Alice Schlein’s book, and Fiberworks PCW, but I have yet to tackle network drafting. Weave on!

    • evasweaving Says:

      Thank you, Fern. This is a vast topic and there’s so much to tackle. What’s next? I don’t know!

  3. Dot Says:

    Very interesting to see your drafts, I’m only just beginning to comprehend the amazing ways of extending 8 shaft twills. I think it’s time I got Alice Schlein’s book.

    I especially like no. 3.

    • evasweaving Says:

      Thanks, Dot, for your comment. This was my first attempt at actually weaving something that’s networked. I also like the book, “The Best of Weaver’s: Twill Thrills” (edited by Madelyn van der Hoogt) because not only does it have a great collection of past articles from Weaver’s Magazine on fancy and advancing twills but also 5 of Alice Schlein’s articles she wrote for Weaver’s on network drafting, including the first one from 1989 (“Network Drafting: More for Less”).

  4. Lyla Dyer Says:

    Eva, I love your scarf and especially draft #3. I don’t know if there is a protocol for using someone’s draft, but i would love to weave a scarf using your draft #3. May I do that?

    • evasweaving Says:

      Lyla, I would be happy if you used my draft! I hope it turns out well. Thank you for your comment.

      Eva


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