My Articles

I have written several articles, here is a list starting with the most recent article first:

“Lampas and Moorman Inlay Pillow” was published in the October 2018 issue (#118) of the Complex Weavers Journal.  Images and downloadable WIF files may viewed on the Complex Weavers website by clicking here.  The images as well as the contents of this article may be viewed on my blog post by clicking here.

“Ikat-Inspired Twill Studies” was published in the February 2014 issue (#104) of the Complex Weavers Journal.  Images and downloadable WIF files may be viewed on the Complex Weavers website by clicking here.  The images as well as the contents of this article may be viewed on my blog post by clicking here.

“Gebrochene to Echo” was published in the October 2012 issue (#100) of the Complex Weavers Journal.  Images and downloadable WIF files may be viewed on the Complex Weavers website by clicking here.  The images as well as the contents of this article may be viewed on my blog post by clicking here.

“Fun With Advancing Twills” was published in the June 2010 issue (#93) of the Complex Weavers Journal and the images and contents of this article may be viewed here.

My earliest article, “Shadow Weave and Log Cabin,” was published in the June 2008 issue (#87) of the Complex Weavers Journal.  Here are excerpts and images from that article:

Shadow Weave and Log Cabin

by Eva Stossel

Fine Threads Study Group

“I have always been intrigued by weaving patterns that appear complex but structurally are very simple. Shadow weave, a color-and-weave effect and mostly plain weave structure, has amazing possibilities.

“The blocks of horizontal and vertical stripes in shadow weave usually follow a twill-step sequence, and two adjacent blocks weave together in the pattern. I wanted my plain weave blocks to be independent of each other, so I realized that I needed something a little different than the commonly used Atwater and Powell methods. I searched the color-and weave drafts at handweaving.net and came across a draft (52461) in which each block had its own distinct pair of shafts. Hmmm, is this log cabin but with more than two blocks? Yes!

“…I started designing profile drafts using 8 threading blocks and 8 treadling blocks, pushing the limits of my faithful 16-shaft Macomber loom. After I finally chose the profile draft….

“As you can see in the drawdown, each block is threaded twice with an extra thread added at the turning points – the even numbered shafts with a dark colored thread and the odd-numbered shafts with a light colored thread.  Treadling is tromp as writ (rising shed).”

Profile Draft 1

Profile Draft 1

Weaving Draft

Weaving Draft

Shadow Weave Sample 1

Shadow Weave Sample 1